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ULTRA LIGHT fishing tackle. anyone ever use it.

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NAHMINT

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In my younger days, well MUCH younger days, I got into the Ultra light fishing ''rage''. had 2 MITCHEL #408 REELS and a matching pair of
HEDDON, i.i.r.c. rods. fished with line as light as 2 lb.test. for brook trout,it was fine but anything else and that line just snapped as tying a knot Further reduced the tensile strength to about 1.5 pound test.......finally had to settle on a 4lb. line on one and a 6 lb. test on the other....
if I had ''enough ''water to play a decent fish,,,,,Smallmouth and Walleye, 4-5 pound bass and 9 pound walleye were catchable..... if I was unfortunate enough to run into a pike or a big eel, the line just got ''bit''. it was a lot of fun and even ''little'' fish had to be played carefully.
 

Bow Walker

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The casting gear that I have is (and has been) always on the light side of things. I want to give the fish a fighting chance plus I want to feel the fight and enjoy the battle.

That's the biggest reason that I got into fly fishing.... :Oh Yeah!:
 

KH4

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If you like light tackle fishing, try Tenkara fishing. It's a hybrid between fly fishing and the old school line on a the end of a stick. Used in Japan on mountain streams for years. Great way to get kids and newbies into the sport.

It's the simplicity that makes it so fun: 10-13ft braided mono line, a tippet, and a fly.

The fact that the poles pack down makes them easy to carry around in a vehicle or a backpack, etc.
 

Bow Walker

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Interesting style of fishing KH4 - thanks for bringing it up and introducing it to this forum....:Oh Yeah!:

This from Googling "Tenkara Fishing" and thanks to Wikipedia.

Tenkara fishing can be seen as a streamlined counterpart to western fly-fishing. The equipment is designed to direct focus to the actual fishing and catching of the fish, not to cause a major preoccupation with the equipment. Only a rod, tenkara line and fly are necessary for tenkara fishing (no reel is used).

The appeal of tenkara is its elegant simplicity. There are also other advantages of using the long tenkara rods when fishing in mountain streams, primarily the lightness of the line and delicate presentation. A long rod allows for precise placement of the fly on small pools and allows for holding the fly in place on the other side of a current. The other main advantage of using the long tenkara rod is precise control for manipulation of the fly.

Rod: A very long and flexible rod (usually telescopic) is used in tenkara fishing. The rods normally range from 3.3 to 4.5 meters (11 to 15 ft) long. These rods were originally made of bamboo, but are nowadays made with carbon and/or fiber glass. They also have a handle similar to fly-fishing rods that can be made of wood (the more prized rods) or cork.

Line: As in fly-fishing, it is the tenkara line that propels the weightless fly forward. In tenkara, the traditional and most commonly used line is a tapered furled line (twisted monofilament), of the same length or slightly shorter than the rod. The main advantage of furled lines is the delicate presentation and ease of casting. Alternatively, a tenkara "level" line can be used. Level lines are specially formulated fluorocarbon adjusted to the desired length. They are easier to cast against the wind.

The traditional tenkara line has a loop of braided line at its thicker end. This braided line is used to tie the tenkara line directly to the tip of the rod by using a cow hitch (aka: girth hitch) knot. The line at the rod's tip needs to have a stopper knot, which will hold the cow hitch in place. It is a very secure method to attach the line.

Tippet: This is the same as a regular fly-fishing tippet, and is used to connect the fly to the line (which is too thick to tie directly to the fly). Usually between 30 cm to 1 meter of tippet is added to the end of the line. This is typically referred to in Japanese as "hea" (for hair).

Fly: Artificial flies are used in tenkara fly-fishing. These are tied with thread, feathers and sometimes fur as in western fly-fishing. Traditionally a special reverse hackle wet-fly is used. In Japan it is known as "kebari". These traditional Japanese flies differ from most Western flies, in that the hackle is tied facing forward. See traditional tenkara flies here My Best Streams by Yoshikazu Fujioka.
 

KH4

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This company, Tenkara Rod Co., makes a variety of sizes for different applications, including something beefy enough to take on salmon in Alaska, see below.

 

stevo911

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I've been looking at Tenkara rods for a while thinking they'd be fun. Haven't got around it to getting one, but I do have a short 3wt fly rod I use occasionally as well.
 
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NAHMINT

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reminds me of my first father IN LAW who lived up in the quebec ''wilderness''. we would go brook trout fishing.... he sat by the beaver pond and as soon as he got a bite,
he yanked on that pole and out came the fish SOMEWHERE behind him...... I finally got tired of chasing his fish......but he ALWAYS LIMITED OUT !!!!
 
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Walleye King

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For jigging for our Sasky walleyes, I currently use a very light weight Fenwick spinning rod (fast action) and I use 6 lb test. Have caught lots of walleyes with this and similar types over the years with a few over 10lbs. Have managed some pike (very carefully) as well but have lost lots when they clamp those teeth down on the bare line.
 
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NAHMINT

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I did try some big brown trout on ultralight but they have a bad habit of sticking their noses between sharp rocks and shaking their heads back and forth to dislodge spinner or cut line....... again,they were in rough shallow water below a wing dam.....
 

Big Lew

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As young fellows, my brothers, friends, and I never had a real rod and reel yet we fished both
Whonnock and Rolley Creeks for trout, steelhead and coho. We used thin fresh cut hazelnut
poles about 7-8 ft long. We tied Cuttyhunk line to the tip, rolling it on or off until we had the right
length we needed for the pool or section of stream we were fishing. We tied on a 3 ft length of gut
leader (no more because it was expensive and hard to get for us) a hook, store bought if we could,
otherwise we made one out of wire, safety pin, or woman's large hair bobby pins. It was a real find
if we located someone's snagged line with hook even if we got real wet when retrieving it.
As I got older I went into light gear and leaders, 2-3 lb test for fly fishing at times, 4 lb for some of the
larger Interior fish, and for fishing the Lower Stave for anything from white fish, dollies, trout, and steelhead.
Nowadays I usually have tapered 3-4 lb line on my fly fishing setups. They make much better line now that
is both thinner and stronger than lines of my youth.
 

stevo911

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I just caved, ordered a Daiwa tenkara rod thats coming from Japan. I do enough hiking in to little lakes and stuff that a 2oz rod and a few flies would be nice bring with.
 

Dru

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Used to... i cant remember what i had but it was really small.. i used it for cuttie fishing in Ukee...

Now i use a 4# .. id like a 3 but i cant afford to buy another flyrod
 

stevo911

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Used to... i cant remember what i had but it was really small.. i used it for cuttie fishing in Ukee...

Now i use a 4# .. id like a 3 but i cant afford to buy another flyrod
You should e-mail Cabelas to start selling their CGR (Cabelas Glass Rod) lineup in Canada. They go on sale for 60-70 bucks in the states and are pretty popular, you get that nice deep bend in the glass fly rods if you hook into something decent.
 

sealevel

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i would pack an inflatable into labourday lake and had an ultra light one of the first grafites . i think i had 6lb on the reel . my wife was allways clumsy she triped and fell on it one day at the lake .
 

Dru

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Stevo, even if i did find a new rod.. in the end it would be hard for me to not use my XP.. i have had it for years.. maybe 16?
I need rods for totally different purposes..
Spey... i keep threatening that... that is my next rod
 

Bow Walker

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As a kid me and my brothers used to go down to the Lougheed highway in Burnaby and do a little fishing. We used 6 foot sticks with about 12 to 18 feet of line wrapped around the end, a couple of split-shot, a bobber and a pocket full of worms in dirt.

The ditch that ran along the highway had fish in it and we followed along to where the creek came in (or out - I can't remember) from/to Burnaby lake. We followed along the creek, fishing at the holes and deep pools. Caught some nice dinner trout back in the day....
 

Big Lew

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Once and awhile 'outsiders' would show up to fish Whonnock Creek while we were
fishing with our hazelnut poles. They came sporting hip waders, fancy vests with
fishing gear attached, and fancy store bought rods complete with snazzy reels filled
with modern mono line. They fished with shiny lures and kept anything they caught,
including very small fish. We always out-fished them with our primitive setups using
worms, berries, or salmon berry flowers. Of course we knew where the best spots were
and would race ahead to fish them before these strangers had a chance. We never had
boots, only cheap runners, but we did have very soaked trousers, lol! We did everything
we could think of to thwart those 'intruders' by placing trip poles covered with leaves,
stirring up clay mud upstream of them, and once even disturbing a wasp nest by the trail.
Boy do I miss those carefree days of my youth!
 

sealevel

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we did the same lew . we had rich relatives from portland they would come up and want to take us kids fishing . they had split bamboo rods , creowls fancy flys . we would secretly laugh at them casting ....we had our fishing sticks. nuts , washers for weights . worms , hellgamits for bait...we always out fished them
 

Big Lew

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we did the same lew . we had rich relatives from portland they would come up and want to take us kids fishing . they had split bamboo rods , creowls fancy flys . we would secretly laugh at them casting ....we had our fishing sticks. nuts , washers for weights . worms , hellgamits for bait...we always out fished them
Yup, forgot to mention the washers or small nuts we also used for weight. Never used split shot until much
later in life even when we found it on snagged lines.
 

Bow Walker

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One day down on the creek off the highway we wanted to jump across the creek bed where it was about 8 feet high on both sides and about 4 feet across.

No problem for a couple of healthy kids.... my buddy tossed his "rod" over to the other side and jumped across. No my turn. I tossed my rod over towards the other side - but the hook caught on the middle finger of my throwing hand. The momentum drove the hook right into my finger - from the bottom of the finger right into and under the fingernail. You could see the end of the hook through the fingernail.

We had to cut the line and I had to wander back home (we lived up and over the hill from the highway, up on E. Georgia St.) at least a good two miles away. Mom freaked and we had to get a neighbor to pull the hook out with a pair of pliers. Hurt like the dickens.

Ah, memories.
 

Big Lew

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Sadly, kids nowadays are also learning and experiencing, as all kids do throughout time, things
that are not healthy or appropriate through their various electronic devices. Other than sports,
what and where can kids learn and experience the way we did before the days of big cities, condo,
and townhouse living? Even those parents that move their families out into the suburbs have great
difficulty in steering their children away from dependence on electronic devices and toward more
healthy outdoors experiences because of peer pressure, actual lack of 'free space', and both parents
having to work. Nope, I'm glad I grew up when and where I did, and that my kids also grew up before
the 'iPhone' era took over their lives.
 

Dru

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i really feel sorry for the kids today . even if they wanted to do the things we did they would not be allowed...and if the parents let them child protection would take them for neglect .

Yep... i never had it as good as you but my dad would drop me amd my buddy on the rover to camp for a couple daya when i was 13 and 14.... i think about that alot, when i look at kids today.....

My great uncle did some really crazy stuff when he was a kid..
 

mastercaster

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Just about all my lake rods are 4 and 5 wts,,,,,all 10' in length. I do have a couple of 3 wts. that I got or built to compensate for the smaller trout that have been in our lake at the cabin the past 5 years and a 6 wt. that is actually a beach rod that I'll take to lakes where there's an excellent chance to hook fish in the 5-8 pound range. They're all Sage XP (3) or Z- Axis rods (3) ,,,,love them all and because I built all but two of them they all were less than half the price of factory rods. The two that weren't were bought at auctions for the same price as my custom builds.

I always use lighter tackle (fly rods) by a good weight or more than the suggested weight for the size of fish I'm targeting. I think when you've been playing fish all your life you know exactly how much backbone you can place on a rod while playing them without fear of breaking your rod. I always play my fish hard so they still have lots of spunk left when you release them.

I have broken rods before but only once while playing a fish. It was a 4 wt. that I was using on the Birkenhead to catch trout that would follow the spring salmon up the river back in the mid nineties. Ended up hooking 4 springs that day,,,,landed 3 of them and the last one snapped my rod in two places. Still landed the fish which was over 20 pounds but my 2 piece rod became the first 4 piece rod that I knew of at the time. LOL
 

Dru

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Lol 4pc...
Id cry....

Tjough i know what your saying..
My 8# on 40+ lb springs was a 1 or 2 fish day... it was all your arms could take...
Was pretty easy to get another fish but you couldnt land them..
 

mastercaster

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Lol 4pc...
Id cry....
Had it been a Sage it would have been no big deal. Full warranty,,,,,$20 replacement for breakage back then. But it wasn't a Sage. All my lake rods were made from Kennedy-Fischer blanks since they were the only 10'ers in existence back then.

Took a quick photo with the phone from my fishing photo book:

unnamed-3.jpg
 

Steelwheels

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??? ... Those four pieces add up to 10 ft...??
Relative to size you must be shorter than Chris...:Yikes!: .....:J/K:

I had a Old Glass Fenwick that blew up on me .. Berkley sent me out a New and Improved one after one call to their customer service... no service fee ... my recollection the two Companies weren't connected at the time of the build of the glass rod...:HUH?:

Great service in them days...:kewl:
 

Buck Naked

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Only ultralight I have is a 6 ft spinner for grayling creeks

any one else dislike Pendlington and how he plays a salmon for 20 minutes of a 30 minute show while using fly fishing gear?

ultralight is fun for light fish, but I'm not a fan of the record book attempts at heavy-on-lightgear awards
 

Big Lew

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Only ultralight I have is a 6 ft spinner for grayling creeks

any one else dislike Pendlington and how he plays a salmon for 20 minutes of a 30 minute show while using fly fishing gear?

ultralight is fun for light fish, but I'm not a fan of the record book attempts at heavy-on-lightgear awards
I admit that it's challenging to be able to land or bring a sizeable fish to boat side before releasing
when using light leaders, but the only reason I use the ultra light leader material is for it's small
diameter and ability to fool fish. I'd much rather not have a fish break the line and leave with my
fly or lure in it's mouth. As for the light rod, I have 3 very light breakdown rods for packsacks, 2 that
work well for spinning, and the better (and more costly) one works well for both spinning and casting
flies. It's a delicate exercise landing a fish over 5-6 lbs with them though.
 

mastercaster

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??? ... Those four pieces add up to 10 ft...??
Relative to size you must be shorter than Chris...:Yikes!: .....:J/K:
Does it look longer than 10' to you? LOL

I did have one single hand fly rod, a 5 wt. that was 11' made by Loomis. Three of us built them up thinking they'd make good chironomid rods. Never had such a slow rod,,,,the thing was a bloody noodle but it got used a lot when I had to do up a 4th rod. Still have it out in the garage.
 

mastercaster

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I admit that it's challenging to be able to land or bring a sizeable fish to boat side before releasing
when using light leaders, but the only reason I use the ultra light leader material is for it's small
diameter and ability to fool fish.
I'd much rather not have a fish break the line and leave with my
fly or lure in it's mouth. As for the light rod, I have 3 very light breakdown rods for packsacks, 2 that
work well for spinning, and the better (and more costly) one works well for both spinning and casting
flies. It's a delicate exercise landing a fish over 5-6 lbs with them though.
No need to go super light in this century what with all the high quality fluorcarbon leader material out there. It's super strong and invisible to the fish. I always use Froghair tippet material. Pricey stuff but it holds up to many days of fishing. Can't remember the last time I've broken off a fish using it. Even though I have a couple of spools of 4 lbs. I usually use 6 lb. It would be the same diameter as your 3 lb. mono stuff.

It's strong enough to pull in a full size adult loon to the boat which I've had to do a few times when the stupid buggers tried to steal a fish, end up knocking the fish off my line, and then getting foul hooked with my fly. Don't even think about landing one of those mean suckers, though. LOL As far as trout are concerned, it'll handle a 10 'er, maybe more,,,,just haven't had too many opportunities to test it out on trout of that size but I know i wouldn't feel the need to baby them in.
 
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NAHMINT

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i would pack an inflatable into labourday lake and had an ultra light one of the first grafites . i think i had 6lb on the reel . my wife was allways clumsy she triped and fell on it one day at the lake .
If that's LABORDAY LAKE off the ''hump'' up Cameron main, what a beautiful place . fished and camped there from 1988 now the S.O.B. forest company has pushed a ''big road thru and destroyed the area......... about 2 years ago.(So you also know PEAK LAKE too????)
 

sealevel

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i know all those places . cop , yellow creek , king solomon , sawed trees down all through that valley starting in 1976 . laborday was about half a klick walk when i fished it .
 

Big Lew

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??? ... Those four pieces add up to 10 ft...??
Relative to size you must be shorter than Chris...:Yikes!: .....:J/K:

I had a Old Glass Fenwick that blew up on me .. Berkley sent me out a New and Improved one after one call to their customer service... no service fee ... my recollection the two Companies weren't connected at the time of the build of the glass rod...:HUH?:

Great service in them days...:kewl:
I had an old Fenwick glass steelhead rod in the 60’s and loved it....until I broke 1 1/2ft off the tip by slamming a gate on it. No problem, I made it into a dandy bar rod and I think I still have it.
 

stevo911

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It's looking like the subalpine lakes I'll be fishing on August long dont' have much backcast room and it sounds like distance is key, so I think I'll be hiking in my itty bitty ugly stick. What kind of spoons/lures do you guys like casting for trout (I only ever tried powerbait before I switched to fly fishing). I'm still kind of debating bringing up a fly rod too just in case I find an area I can make it work (or just roll cast) but that's more gear to carry...
 

Dru

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Alpine lakes = tiny gear like 1/16oz "0"'s
tiny spinners and a couple tiny Crocs... Crocks cast super far but have a bit of impact on the water when they land....
meps, panther martin, roostertails..... all in a normal color pattern..... though the "yellow body red dot " Panther is a known killer
 

Dru

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Alpine lakes = tiny gear like 1/16oz "0"'s
tiny spinners and a couple tiny Crocs... Crocks cast super far but have a bit of impact on the water when they land....
meps, panther martin, roostertails..... all in a normal color pattern..... though the "yellow body red dot " Panther is a known killer

and a maximum of 4 lb test
 

stevo911

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Alpine lakes = tiny gear like 1/16oz "0"'s
tiny spinners and a couple tiny Crocs... Crocks cast super far but have a bit of impact on the water when they land....
meps, panther martin, roostertails..... all in a normal color pattern..... though the "yellow body red dot " Panther is a known killer
Thanks Dru,
Gonna have to check those all out. I guess I should probably respool that reel anyways since the line was like 4 or 5lb test that is ~8+ years old. (I'd assume it loses strength over the better part of a decade)
 

Big Lew

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A couple of alpine lakes I loved to fish also were a fly casting challenge.
Even if you're fairly adept at a 'roll cast', you need maximum distance to
reach the larger fish. I bring along 3 piece back packing rods that can double
at spin casting or fly tossing. I find the mepps style # 2 in black with bright red,
yellow, or fluorescent green spots work well as does the silver fox with any coloured
body and either silver or brass blades. Rooster tails also do well on occasion.
As for using old line...if it's low strength thin mono it's best to just replace it as it does
lose it's strength over time. You can get very frustrated after losing most of your spinners
because it broke off while playing a fish. (so I've been told, lol)
 
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