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For all you smokers (of fine meats) and grillers

Bow Walker

TROUBLE SHOOTER.
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On most pork bellies there is a bit on either side that is pretty fat, with very little meat in it... I'd advise trimming this part off before brining or injecting. Save the rimmed part for sausage.

I realize tha tit is a little late for you Phil, but some others might benefit. :popcorn:

pork-belly.jpg
 
Thread starter #6

philcott

Mucho Gusto
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No, sadly I did a bad, bad thing and tossed them. You've never put directions for rind on here so I don't know how to make them. Also, I'd eat too many if I made them.
 

Bow Walker

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Pork rinds are pretty easy to make.

First, you need to cut the rind into bite-size pieces and simmer them in plain water for as long as it takes to make them semi-transparent. They will then be somewhat like a wet noodle.

Take them out of the water and scrape any residual fat off and remove any other impurities. Place the rinds on a rack on a baking sheet and set your oven to its lowest temperature - place the baking sheet with the rinds on it in the oven and allow to dehydrate completely - usually about 90 to 120 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool to room temp. At this point they can be stored in an air tight container for about a week or so, if desired.

When ready, heat a pan of oil to 400 degrees - a deep cast iron pan (or heavy pot) works well for this step. Use a candy thermometer to ensure the proper temperature.

Carefully drop a few rinds into the hot oil and watch the magic happen. The rinds will start to puff up and pop right away. When they begin to float to the top, use a slotted spoon to move them around so they cook thoroughly. Any uncooked areas will be tough and chewy rather than crispy. Do your rinds in small batches so as not to cool the oil down to far. Cooler oil will only make the rinds soggy and tough.

As soon as they are done - the will float to the surface and look puffy- remove the cooked rinds from the pan and lay them out on a layer or two of paper towel to drain. Season immediately, while they are still hot. Your seasoning can be anything from plain salt and pepper to something more flavorful.
 

Bow Walker

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Some different kinds of seasoning....

Spicy-Sweet Seasoning Blend:
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon maple sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ancho chili powder


Five-Spice Seasoning Blend:
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt


Richmond's Dipping Sauce:
  • 1/2 cup vinegar (rice wine, apple cider or white distilled)
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chili paste (sambal) or crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed


Canadiana Blend (Dan’s)
  • Seasoning salt
  • Garlic powder
  • Onion powder
  • Freshly ground black pepper
 
Thread starter #13

philcott

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Mine turned out good but is a little salty. Next time I'll do a little less time in the brine or start with larger pieces.
 

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