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Home Page for Badlands Knifeworks and Cypress County Calls

Need your best moose roast dinner ideas

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Fella

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So I'm making dinner for some friends who have been a big help with our renovations this Saturday, wanting to make a really good moose roast dinner, send me your favourite recipes and some ideas for sides! Many thanks!
 

Bow Walker

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I think I'd go classic Joel.

Roast beast with a herb rub, smashed garlic potatoes, brussel sprouts au gratin, carrots w/ ginger butter, ciabatta buns, and a hearty cab sauvignon to assuage any thirst that might arise....
 

ScubaDave

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We just throw them in the slow cooker, with onions and garlic, cut up into pieces, plus same ingredients in powder form, just a little and some potatoes. Salt and pepper. Chicken broth for the liquid.
 

Paleolith

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Season the roast with salt, pepper, thyme and rosemary and set aside on the counter.

In a cast iron pan, fry up a bunch of sliced onion and mushrooms in oil and butter until they are carmelized and the pan is a bit sticky. Set the onions and mushrooms aside.

Add some more oil to the pan and brown the entire outside of the roast for a few minutes, turning to get all sides brown and even a bit crisp.

Set the roast in a roasting pan and surround it with oiled and seasoned root vegetables like carrots, potatoes, parsnips, etc.

Return the onions and mushrooms to the pan and bring the heat up till you get some crispy bits. Don't burn it, but lots of brown. Then dump in about a cup of red wine and deglaze the pan. Scrape the bits and then let reduce the heat and let the wine mixture reduce bu 1/2.

When the onion mushroom wine sauce is looking good, slather it all over the top of the roast and put about an inch of water in the roasting pan and then stick the works in a 350 oven till the internal temperature hits around 135-145, depending on how you like it.

I find it much better on the rare side.

Serve it all together and make sure everyone gets some of the sauce. This one is a crowd pleaser.
 
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Bow Walker

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Paleo's method sounds like a winner. :Oh Yeah!:



As for my method, I'd make my mixture in a bowl by adding salt, pepper, thyme leaves, marjoram leaves, and some dried onion bits. Mix it well and rub it into the roast.

Have the oven pre-heated to 425 degrees and leave the roast uncovered (at that temp) for about 15 - 20 minutes, depending on the size of the roast. After that time you could place a few bacon strips over the top ov the roast (to baste it) and reduce the temperature to 300 degrees.

Cook until internal temp reaches the "rare" setting and then bring the roast out of the oven. Set it on the counter and tent it with foil. Let it sit for at least 8 - 10 minutes before carving.
 

Paleolith

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I bet Dan's method is great too, and it is less hassle for sure.

Basically any recipe will work as long as the result is rare/medium-rare meat. The exception to this is the slow cooker method, which results in well-done and tender meat due to the extended cooking time and the liquid.

Roasting till well-done will not impress anyone. If your guests are squeemish about rare meat, maybe the slow cooker is the way to go.

Another way I like to do it is low and slow in the oven and then finish it over charcoal. Basically you just season the roast and put it in a 220 F oven till it hits about 130 F internal. This can take 4 or 5 hours or more, depending on the size of the roast. When it is up to around 120 F you start getting the charcoal going so it is ready by the time the roast is up to 130-135. Then you throw that roast over the hot charcoal and brown it up really nice on all sides. Maybe even add some Applewood or whatever to give it a touch of smoke.

The result is a roast with a nice crust about 1cm thick, but then is perfectly and uniformly reddish pink all the way through. Very little grey.

Contrary to popular belief, this will not dry out you roast. It works just as well with a boneless prime rib as it does with deer or moose.
 
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Paleolith

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The science behind why the low and slow (with searing done at the end) works so well.

http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/prime_rib_roast.html

If you read the entire page and follow the instructions, your roast will look exactly like the photos. It works great with deer and moose!

You can do the entire thing on the BBQ as described, but using an oven for the bulk of the cooking (low and slow part) is much easier.

I have done it entirely on the grill a couple of times and it is an all-day project that involves quite a bit of beer and patience. The results are spectacular, of course.

If you have a Big Green Egg or something similar, it would be less work. I only have a Weber Kettle so I was tending it all day.
 
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Algorithm

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I love roasts! I prefer the slow cooker method as I have some picky eaters. I would untie the roast and un roll it. Get some maple bacon or regular or pork belly and roll it back into the roast an re tie. Into the slow cooker with 2 cups of beef broth. The bacon or pork belly has enough fat to help make the roast nice and tender! I use the left over broth to make gravy. Season the roast with your favourite spices. Paleo searing of the outside of the roast is a good idea too. I don't bother trying to slice it, it comes apart easily and tastes great!
 

Leaseman

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I love roasts! I prefer the slow cooker method as I have some picky eaters. I would untie the roast and un roll it. Get some maple bacon or regular or pork belly and roll it back into the roast an re tie. Into the slow cooker with 2 cups of beef broth. The bacon or pork belly has enough fat to help make the roast nice and tender! I use the left over broth to make gravy. Season the roast with your favourite spices. Paleo searing of the outside of the roast is a good idea too. I don't bother trying to slice it, it comes apart easily and tastes great!
That is a hit!

Maybe add some home made blue cheese "butter".......

I am not a fan of any roast.....Any game meat I do is Steaks.....then ground for something! Although I do like to muscle cut a large amount....then I can thaw it for anything from steaks to jerky!! :Oh Yeah!:
 

Paleolith

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Although I do like to muscle cut a large amount....then I can thaw it for anything from steaks to jerky!! :Oh Yeah!:
I leave all my stuff "muscle cut" as you say, and nicely trimmed/cleaned up. Even if I know I am going to eat the majority as steaks, it remains better preserved as a "roast" and it is plenty easy to cut into steaks before grilling.

The one cut that I find better as a roast than steaks is the sirloin tip. The "torpedo" shape and the various different muscles don't make for a great, consistent steak. At least, not nearly as good as backstraps, top round or bottom round.
 

Bow Walker

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The Sirloin Tip is a relatively small muscle which is connected to the knee cap or patella. That makes for a lot of connective tissue/silverskin/ligament type of tougher stuff, that really does not do well as a steak..... especially toward the narrower part (where everything comes together to connect to the knee cap). this miscle does much, much better as a roast that is cooked slower, letting the tougher connective tissue sort of dissolve into gelatinous goodness.....
 

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