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How do you guys stuff em?

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stevo911

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I have an electric grinder with its stuffing attachments, and an old hand crank grinder (without any good spot to clamp it), which are what I've been using.

My dad and my hunting partner use those curved cast aluminum presses where the plunger doesn't seal worth a damn.

Does anyone use the vertical/horizontal screw type suffers, or the stainless version of the curved press? I'm wondering what the best option is for a steady feed and one man operation. (3-5lb capacity is plenty)
 

philcott

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I bought this Dakota stuffer a few years back after struggling with numerous methods and am more than just pleased with it. I should have bought one years before. If only I had known about it. I picked mine up in the USA when we were on a trip to Spokane one day. As long as yuo have enough casing on the stuffing horn you can set the speed (through water flow) and make the sausage in a one man operation. Run out of casing and the meat will still extrude until you can turn the water off. I should make a foot pedal attachment that will solve this problem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poNDOxpkJUo
 

KTownKiller

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I bought this Dakota stuffer a few years back after struggling with numerous methods and am more than just pleased with it. I should have bought one years before. If only I had known about it. I picked mine up in the USA when we were on a trip to Spokane one day. As long as yuo have enough casing on the stuffing horn you can set the speed (through water flow) and make the sausage in a one man operation. Run out of casing and the meat will still extrude until you can turn the water off. I should make a foot pedal attachment that will solve this problem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poNDOxpkJUo

Now that's awesome! :Oh Yeah!:
 
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stevo911

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Ok, that's pretty slick Phil. I never came across any of those in my search.

Last night I made 3 lbs of snack'n sticks, my buddies curved press style stuffer was the only thing that had a horn small enough for the casings. Took me 2 hours to stuff 3lbs with that thing :Doh!:
 
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stevo911

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I always found the horns let more meat out past the plunger than it lets through the tube.
That's exactly what happened with this, especially with the smaller tube. For every inch of tube filled a fist sized wad would get past the plunger.
I realized our faucet won't really work with the dakotah one, and with our counter layout it might be a pain to use, but I found this thing, looks like it might be worth a try, especially for the price, a canadian product, and a lot less plastic:
http://www.wholesaleinnovations.com/SGMNAMSV3
 
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Dru

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phil, go to Canadian Tire and buy a Gate valve and just install it dorect on to the stuffers inlet ... screw the hose to it..... that's what id do
 

philcott

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Dru, there is a smaller gate valve already on it but if I'm feeding sausage onto the casings and I run out of casing I need to shut it off before too much feeds out the end. That said if it does feed out it's not a huge amount and you can simply put it back in the feeder and run it through.
 

Dru

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ok so the pressure in the "Tank" needs to be relieved not too the tank...
how much was that? have you seen them here since?
I know I have chatted with you before ion this thing!
 

philcott

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I've not seen them here but I know Gate has one. I'm not sure if he got it in Canada or the US.

This is where I bought mine but it was around $100.00 when I got it and our dollar was about even.
 
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stevo911

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From what I found in the little bit of searching I did before I realised it wouldn't work well for my setup, you can get them in Canada, but they start at about $190
 
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stevo911

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steve gimme a review when you get it.
Will do, I couldn't find any legit reviews for it aside from star ratings that didn't say much
phill are you stopping the machine to "twist the link"? or do you fill the length and twist after?
Real men fill the full coil (just spiral it on a big serving platter) and then link it all up after. Just sayin'.
 
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stevo911

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Sorry Steve, but I gotta do this....

Q. How do you guys stuff em?

A. Right down my lunch hole!!
Lol, and here I was when I saw you had replied, expecting some super awesome post with a veteran sausage makers knowledge covering aspects i hadn't come close to considering... :p
 

Bow Walker

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OK, OK...

Natural casings are sometimes tricky to store.

First, they come packed in salt to preserve them - you need to flush the salt so your sausage doesn't pick it up. Flush thoroughly in cold water, changing the water several times. Then keep them in a bowl or pail, half-filled with clean cold water, beside the stuffer as you make your sausage. Pull out one strand at a time and find the end - separate the skin so you can fill the casing tube with a several ounces of cold water - this re-flushes the inside of the casing and also prevents knots from forming as you slip it onto the horn.

After you finish making sausage and you want to store the leftover casings (for a long time) - drain them thoroughly, pat dry,and put them in a plastic bag. Add a few scoops of salt - don't use coarse pickling salt (table salt works just fine). Work the salt into the casings in the bag and remove the air before knotting the bag. Toss into the freezer until next sausage session - they will keep frozen for at least a year (or more).

Short term storage is the same as long term storage - except you put the bag in to the fridge. They will keep for up to 10 - 12 days before beginning to rot. You should not store them fresh for any longer. Smell the fresh-stored casings before using them- you'll know if they are "off".....
 

Bow Walker

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The dry, collagen casings are best stored in a plastic bag and put in the cupboard - dry and room temperature.

Ask the butcher to show you which end goes on the horn first - stuffing direction does matter. Also, you need a straight stuffing horn - not the tapered ones - to use the collagen casings.

This is what a full tube of collagen casing looks like. It's dry and paper-like in texture.

22221723-origpic-3256fe.jpg



One end of the tube (if it is a full tube) looks like the circled part, it looks tapered to a bit of a point. This is the end that goes onto the horn first. The end that is squared in red is the end that faces outward from the stuffer.

images.jpg



This is what it looks like as you stuff the casings. Notice he controls how much meat gets i nto the casing by using his left hand? Holding back the casing causes it to fill tighter as you crank on the plunger.

xstarting-stuffing2.jpg.pagespeed.ic.bCNDy5E_4Y.jpg
 

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philcott

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Damn Dan, I've been putting my casings on backwards all these years. Sausage tastes ok though but probably made the job a bit tougher.
 
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stevo911

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lol, I was just kidding Dan, but you sure did follow through. I learned something new. I also did battle with collagen casings the other day, I definitely prefer natural.
 

Dru

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Dan, Why a straight tube for collagen?
which are easiest to use?

this is what I was wondering... oh,,, I didn't mean to call you a perv lol.. I typer PRE Vert" its more funny1
 
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stevo911

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Collagen casings dont really stretch (they feel kind of like heavy tissue paper) and are folded in a special way to make those little logs, so to fit in on a stuffing horn that fits it needs to be untapered.

From what I've seen collagen can be a bit more consistent of a product to stuff, but it's a lot less forgiving with moisture, and it's more impermeable, so you'll get less fluid loss (up until the casing splits) when you're cooking it.

Natural casings are a bit more work, and are finnicky to get loaded on, but only add a couple minutes to the process. Sometimes you'll get blowouts if it's been nicked/damaged/there's a thin spot. But they stretch and cook up better, and realistically only add a few minutes to the process.

For sausages that you're going to grill I always go natural. If you're doing salamis and stuff you want to peel the casing off, artificial is probably better. For other stuff I'm sure there are advantages to collagen, but I haven't done much smoking or anything to really figure that aspect out.
 

Bow Walker

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Phil - if you're doing them backwards, I can visualize the little links squirming and wriggling - trying to avoid that bottomless pit that everyone refers to as a "mouth"...... :Heh, heh, heh:
Picture THAT in the theatre of your mind.... :ROFL::OH-OH:





Steve - natural casings are way easier to twist or tie, but they become tough and hard to chew when they are cooked. Collagen casings "snap" when you bite them (after they are cooked of course) and they are easily digested. The trick with the artificial (collagen) casings to not over-fill them so they become plump and tight.... impossible to twist, link or tie. If they are filled right (loosely enough) a pinch with your index finger and thumb and then a few quick turns (twists) to link them to whatever size you want. If you pinch every one, but twist (turn) every other one they come out just like you see in the stores, and don't unravel as they sit on the counter.....


Dru - you need a straight stuffing tube (horn) for the collagen (artificial) casings because that's the way they are manufactured. Natural casings have a taper in t hem for their whole length throughout the body of the animal - they are intestines, after all. While manufactured collagen casings do not have a taper, they sre straight.
22221723-origpic-3256fe.jpg


The difference is very noticeable in the stuffing tubes or horns.

The best stuffing horns are the straight ones - they can be used for either or casing style.

Most stuffing horns that come with a stuffer these days are of the straight kind. But they used to be tapered....

Straight horns
03008013_1.jpg



Tapered horns.
1841.jpg








.... and Dru? Ya gots to calls 'em as ya sees 'em..... you got it right, buddy. :hopelessness:
 

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stevo911

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The trick with the artificial (collagen) casings to not over-fill them so they become plump and tight.... impossible to twist, link or tie. If they are filled right (loosely enough) a pinch with your index finger and thumb and then a few quick turns (twists) to link them to whatever size you want. If you pinch every one, but twist (turn) every other one they come out just like you see in the stores, and don't unravel as they sit on the counter.....
I actually just figured a bunch of that via trial and (mostly) error last night. Fortunately unraveled snack'n sticks should taste pretty close to the same ;)
 
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